Deep sky astrophotography using EAA live stacking lucky imaging and short exposure techniques

Welcome to my Website

Welcome - here you will find deep sky images of faint fuzzies, very small and interesting deep sky objects. Most of my astrophotography time is spend on deepsky imaging using short exposure techniques ans lucky imaging, this means short exposures in the range of 500 ms to 10 seconds per sub. With short exposures you do not need an expensive mount, auto-guiding is also not needed. Also, I don't use my Rasa 8 for widefield imaging ;-)...go to short exposure and lucky imaging techniques

Latest Results

The Ring Nebula (also catalogued as Messier 57, M57 or NGC 6720) is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Lyra, taken with lucky imaging method approx. 3.900 x 1 second exposure time., with ASI533MC and Takahashi Mewlon 210, focal length 1961mm, first light
Read more, M 57, Messier 57

NGC 2857 (also known as Arp 1 and PGC 26666) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation Ursa Major. It was discovered on January 9, 1856 by R. J. Mitchell. NGC 2857 is the first object in Halton Arp's Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies, and one of six Arp objects in the 'Low Surface Brightness Galaxies' section. Arp 285 below to the right is an interacting pair of galaxies. Both are spirals. NGC2854 is quite a bit larger (65000 Ly) compared to NGC2856 (35000 Ly). The image was made with ZWO ASI533MC and Celestron RASA 8 f/2.0, taken with my short exposure method 22x 60x 10 s.
Read more, NGC 2857 - NGC 2854 - NGC 2856 - Arp 1 and Arp 285 - 4K high resolution

NGC 5907 is a beautiful spiral galaxy also known as Knife Edge Galaxy or Splinter Galaxy in the northern constellation Draco. The image was made with ZWO ASI533MC and Celestron RASA 8 f/2.0, taken with my short exposure method 30x 60x 10 s.
Read more, NGC 5907 - 4K high resolution

M 95 - NGC 3351 found in the constellation Leo, is a beautiful barred spiral galaxy. The central regions of barred galaxies like M 95 (NGC 3351) often include distinct morphological features in the form of small rings and secondary bars. The rings, known as nuclear rings because of their proximity to the nucleus well inside the ends of the primary bar, are sites of some of the most spectacular starbursts, shown here in inset. The image was made with ASI533MC and Celestron RASA 8 f/2.0, taken with my short exposure method 20x 60x 10 s.
Read more, M 95 - NGC 3351 - 4K high resolution

Abell 2218 is a cluster of galaxies about 2 billion light-years away in the constellation Draco. Acting as a powerful lens, it magnifies and distorts all galaxies lying behind the cluster core into long arcs. There are two arcs, z = 1.03 corresponds approx. to 6 billion light-years, z = 0.7 corresponds approx to 6.5 billion light-years. A Redshift Lookup Table for our Universe The image was made with ASI533MC and Celestron RASA 8 f/2.0, taken with my short exposure method 2340 x 10 s.
Read more, Abell 2218 - 4K resolution

NGC 2623/Arp 243 is an interacting galaxy located in the constellation Cancer. NGC 2623 is the result of two spiral galaxies that have merged. Due to NGC 2623 being in the late stage of merging, the compression of the gas within the galaxy has led to a large amount of star formation, and to its unique structure of a bright core with two extending tidal tails. The image was taken with my RASA 8.
Read more, NGC 2623 - Arp 243 - 4K resolution

NGC 2685 (also known as the Helix Galaxy) is a lenticular and polar ring Seyfert Type 2 galaxy in the constellation Ursa Major. It is about 50,000 light-years across and about 42 million light-years away from Earth. It is an object of great scientific interest, because polar-ring galaxies are very rare galaxies, the image was taken with my RASA 8. The inset is from Hubble Space Telescope (HST).
Read more, ngc 2685 - Arp 336 - 4K resolution

The Whirlpool Galaxy, also known as Messier 51, M51, Arp 85 and NGC 5194 NGC 5195, is an interacting grand-design spiral galaxy with a Seyfert 2 active galactic nucleus. It lies in the constellation Canes Venatici, and was the first galaxy to be classified as a spiral galaxy. The image was taken with my RASA 8.
Read more, M51 4K resolution

Arp 322 is a small group of galaxies with a size of 2.1 arc minutes and a magnitude of 14.7 mag, a faint fuzzy. Arp 322 is an interacting group of galaxies in the constellation Usar Major. A four-way interaction going on with a dusty spiral disk onlooker apparently far enough away from the activity not to be disturbed much by it. This group sits just south of the magnificent NGC 3718. The image was taken with my RASA 8. The inset is from Hubble Space Telescope (HST).
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Arp 273 is a pair of interacting galaxies, 300 million light years away in the constellation Andromeda. It was first described in the Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies, compiled by Halton Arp in 1966. The larger of the spiral galaxies, known as UGC 1810, is about five times more massive than the smaller galaxy. The image was taken with my 8" RASA, a 8" Rowe-Ackermann Schmidt Astrograph.
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Arp 104, also known as Keenan's system, is entry 104 in Halton Arp's Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies catalog for spiral galaxy NGC 5216 and globular galaxy NGC 5218. The two galaxies are joined by a bridge of galactic material spanning 22.000 light years. The image was taken with my 8" RASA, a 8" Rowe-Ackermann Schmidt Astrograph.
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Arp 224 or NGC 3921 is a interacting galaxy in the northern constellation of Ursa Major. Estimates using redshift put the galaxy at about 59 million light years (18 megaparsecs) away. It was discovered on 14 April 1789 by William Herschel, and it was described as "pretty faint, small, round" by John Louis Emil Dreyer, size 2.1 × 1.3 arcsec, 13.10 mag. The image was taken with my 8" RASA, a 8" Rowe-Ackermann Schmidt Astrograph.
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Mayall's Object, VV32 (also classified under the Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies as Arp 148) is the result of two colliding galaxies located 500 million light years away within the constellation of Ursa Major. It was discovered by American astronomer Nicholas U. Mayall of the Lick Observatory on 13 March 1940, size 0.6 x 0.5 arcsec, 15.0 mag. The image was taken with my 8" RASA, a 8" Rowe-Ackermann Schmidt Astrograph.
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Messier 87 (also known as Virgo A or NGC 4486, generally abbreviated to M87) is a supergiant elliptical galaxy in the constellation Virgo. One of the most massive galaxies in the local universe. The core contains a supermassive black hole (SMBH). The jet of matter is ejected from M87 at nearly the speed of light, and stretches 1.5 kpc (5000 ly) from the galactic core.
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Messier 82 (also known as NGC 3034, Cigar Galaxy, M82 or Arp 337) is a starburst galaxy approximately 12 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. A member of the M81 Group, it is about five times more luminous than the whole Milky Way and has a center one hundred times more luminous than our galaxy's center. The starburst activity is thought to have been triggered by interaction with neighboring galaxy M81.
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Andromeda's Parachute is a bright Quadruply Lensed Quasar at z=2.377 and located in constellation Andromeda with a size of only 3 arcsec. J014709+463037 was discovered by PAN-STARRS June 2017
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Perseus A Galaxy Cluster - it shows the gravitational relations, tidal forces and interactions of the individual galaxies and the galaxy cluster, imaged with Celestron RASA C11
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NGC 3718 galaxy group, imaged with Celestron C11 RASA
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NGC 7027 planetary nebular, imaged with Celestron C11 RASA
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J014709+463037 or Andromeda Parachute, imaged with Celestron C8 f/5
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Equipment

The Celestron RASA C8 f/2.0 Rowe-Ackermann Schmidt Astrograph is a dedicated instrument, it can only be used at f/2.0 like a Schmidt-Camera. Unlike the larger RASAs that work with DSLR and large CCD cameras, the 8” model was designed with color astronomical CMOS cameras, smaller CCD cameras, and mirrorless cameras in mind. The telescope does not work with standard DSLR cameras.


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Techniques

lucky imaging

Lucky Imaging is an effective technique for delivering near-diffraction-limited imaging on telescopes.


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exoplanet detection

The most successful type of data collection by the amateur is the transit method. As a planet passes over the portion of the star facing us, the light curve of the star drops for a time. As the planet passes through, the light curve returns to normal.


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high resolution imaging

You can further improve resolution of your images by improving your FWHM.


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